Journal of Archives in Military Medicine Journal of Archives in Military Medicine J Arch Mil Med http://www.jammonline.com 2345-5071 2345-5063 10.5812/jamm en jalali 2017 6 27 gregorian 2017 6 27 4 1
en 10.5812/jamm.37046 Past, Present and Future of Iranian Naval Health and Maritime Medicine Past, Present and Future of Iranian Naval Health and Maritime Medicine editorial editorial Naval Medicine;Military Medicine;Maritime Medicine Naval Medicine;Military Medicine;Maritime Medicine http://www.jammonline.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=37046 Ali Reza Khoshdel Ali Reza Khoshdel Epidemiology Research Centre, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Epidemiology Research Centre, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel/Fax: +98-2188337909 Epidemiology Research Centre, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Epidemiology Research Centre, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel/Fax: +98-2188337909
en 10.5812/jamm.36624 Quality of Life in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Narrative Overview Quality of Life in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Narrative Overview review-article review-article Conclusions

It is crucial for clinicians to be aware of the importance of measuring HRQoL. Understanding the factors causing impairment of HRQoL is also important for clinicians seeing these patients as it helps to individualise treatment and treat the patient more holistically, to achieve greater patient satisfaction.

Results

We summarized the data available in the literature to show that HRQoL is poorer in patients with IBS compared to healthy controls, and compared to most serious chronic conditions. There are several factors that contribute to HRQoL impairments in IBS, of which gastrointestinal symptoms, physical co-morbidities, psychosocial factors and demographics all play significant roles.

Evidence Acquisition

We performed electronic literature searches in Medline, the Cochrane library, and digestive disease week (DDW) meeting abstracts. Across all databases searched, common keywords included “Irritable bowel syndrome”, “Quality of life” and “Health related quality of life”. For databases that accommodated Boolean searches, terms specifically related to QOL and military were added.

Context

Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is increasingly important in the assessment of chronic conditions, especially for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which has no associated mortality, but is prevalent and significantly impacts patient’s lives. Disease-specific instruments such as the irritable bowel syndrome quality of life instrument (IBS-QOL), in addition to generic instruments such as the short form (SF)-36, are useful in measuring health-related quality of life, and have been shown to be reliable in assessing disease severity and as an endpoint to monitor treatment response. We reviewed the impact of IBS on patients’ HRQoL, the factors causing HRQoL impairments, and the utility of HRQoL instruments in the assessment of IBS.

Conclusions

It is crucial for clinicians to be aware of the importance of measuring HRQoL. Understanding the factors causing impairment of HRQoL is also important for clinicians seeing these patients as it helps to individualise treatment and treat the patient more holistically, to achieve greater patient satisfaction.

Results

We summarized the data available in the literature to show that HRQoL is poorer in patients with IBS compared to healthy controls, and compared to most serious chronic conditions. There are several factors that contribute to HRQoL impairments in IBS, of which gastrointestinal symptoms, physical co-morbidities, psychosocial factors and demographics all play significant roles.

Evidence Acquisition

We performed electronic literature searches in Medline, the Cochrane library, and digestive disease week (DDW) meeting abstracts. Across all databases searched, common keywords included “Irritable bowel syndrome”, “Quality of life” and “Health related quality of life”. For databases that accommodated Boolean searches, terms specifically related to QOL and military were added.

Context

Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is increasingly important in the assessment of chronic conditions, especially for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which has no associated mortality, but is prevalent and significantly impacts patient’s lives. Disease-specific instruments such as the irritable bowel syndrome quality of life instrument (IBS-QOL), in addition to generic instruments such as the short form (SF)-36, are useful in measuring health-related quality of life, and have been shown to be reliable in assessing disease severity and as an endpoint to monitor treatment response. We reviewed the impact of IBS on patients’ HRQoL, the factors causing HRQoL impairments, and the utility of HRQoL instruments in the assessment of IBS.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome;Health-Related Quality of Life Irritable Bowel Syndrome;Health-Related Quality of Life http://www.jammonline.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=36624 Andrew Ming Liang Andrew Ming Liang Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore. Tel: +65-63214684, Fax: +65-62273623 Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore. Tel: +65-63214684, Fax: +65-62273623 Yu Tien Yu Tien Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
en 10.5812/jamm.33056 Evaluation of the Prevalence of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases in Submarine Navy Personnel of the Army of the Islamic Republic of Iran Evaluation of the Prevalence of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases in Submarine Navy Personnel of the Army of the Islamic Republic of Iran research-article research-article Materials and Methods

In this cross-sectional study, 74 submarine crew and 28 marine personnel participated after signing a written informed consent statement. The data was collected using a questionnaire that included items on the demographic data, medical and dental history, behaviors related to oral and dental health, and the probability of emergency dental conditions on the mission. The questionnaire was filled out for each participant by a dentist after performing clinical and paraclinical assessments. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.

Results

The DMFT index (decayed, missing, and filled teeth) for the submarine and marine groups were 5.24 ± 4.16 and 8 ± 5.94, respectively. The number of missing teeth and the MDFT index were significantly higher in the marine group (P < 0.05). The two groups were not significantly different in terms of the rate of emergency dental incidents during the mission. These incidents include temporomandibular joint click, dental fluorosis, dental trauma, and behaviors related to oral and dental health (P > 0.05). Prevalence of the aphthous stomatitis was significantly higher in the submarine group (P < 0.05).

Conclusions

In general, the oral and dental health status of the submarine crew was better than that of the marine group. The prevalence of aphthous stomatitis, however, was significantly higher in the submarine group. One of the etiologies considered for that condition is stress.

Background

Oral and dental care is very important for submarine crews, as they live in confined spaces while they are on their missions. If emergency dental conditions occur during submarine operations, dentistry services are not available.

Objectives

The objective of the current study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral and maxillofacial diseases among submarine personnel.

Materials and Methods

In this cross-sectional study, 74 submarine crew and 28 marine personnel participated after signing a written informed consent statement. The data was collected using a questionnaire that included items on the demographic data, medical and dental history, behaviors related to oral and dental health, and the probability of emergency dental conditions on the mission. The questionnaire was filled out for each participant by a dentist after performing clinical and paraclinical assessments. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.

Results

The DMFT index (decayed, missing, and filled teeth) for the submarine and marine groups were 5.24 ± 4.16 and 8 ± 5.94, respectively. The number of missing teeth and the MDFT index were significantly higher in the marine group (P < 0.05). The two groups were not significantly different in terms of the rate of emergency dental incidents during the mission. These incidents include temporomandibular joint click, dental fluorosis, dental trauma, and behaviors related to oral and dental health (P > 0.05). Prevalence of the aphthous stomatitis was significantly higher in the submarine group (P < 0.05).

Conclusions

In general, the oral and dental health status of the submarine crew was better than that of the marine group. The prevalence of aphthous stomatitis, however, was significantly higher in the submarine group. One of the etiologies considered for that condition is stress.

Background

Oral and dental care is very important for submarine crews, as they live in confined spaces while they are on their missions. If emergency dental conditions occur during submarine operations, dentistry services are not available.

Objectives

The objective of the current study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral and maxillofacial diseases among submarine personnel.

Aphthous Stomatitis;Oral Hygiene;Submarine Medicine;Temporomandibular Joint Aphthous Stomatitis;Oral Hygiene;Submarine Medicine;Temporomandibular Joint http://www.jammonline.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=33056 Bita Rohani Bita Rohani Department of Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Hassan Shahamatnia Hassan Shahamatnia Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mostafa Maddah Mostafa Maddah Marine and Submarine Medicine Research Centre, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Marine and Submarine Medicine Research Centre, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Amir Abbas Sameti Amir Abbas Sameti Marine and Submarine Medicine Research Centre, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Marine and Submarine Medicine Research Centre, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9132674100 Marine and Submarine Medicine Research Centre, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Marine and Submarine Medicine Research Centre, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9132674100 Amir Hossein Najafpour Amir Hossein Najafpour Marine and Submarine Medicine Research Centre, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Marine and Submarine Medicine Research Centre, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Reza Fekrazad Reza Fekrazad Department of Periodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Periodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
en 10.5812/jamm.33430 Effects of a Two-Month Training Period on Soldiers’ General Health, Social Physique Anxiety, and Body Mass Index Effects of a Two-Month Training Period on Soldiers’ General Health, Social Physique Anxiety, and Body Mass Index research-article research-article Conclusions

The findings showed that the military training period can significantly affect anxiety, but it cannot affect the health and body mass index.

Results

The results of the paired t-test showed that there were significant differences in pre-test and post-test scores on the general health aspects of anxiety and social physique anxiety and there were no significant differences in other aspects of soldiers’ general health and body mass index. This suggests that the two-month training period affects only the variables of anxiety (anxiety, insomnia, and social physique anxiety).

Objectives

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a two-month military service period on soldiers’ general health, social physique anxiety, and body mass index. Materials and Methods: The sample included all soldiers in Isfahan’s army garrison training period. A 28-item questionnaire on general health, a social physique anxiety questionnaire (Hart et al. 1989) that measured the social physical anxiety and the ratio of weight to the height square calculating body mass index.

Background

Changes in the environment and living conditions are associated with changes in physical and cognitive functions.

Conclusions

The findings showed that the military training period can significantly affect anxiety, but it cannot affect the health and body mass index.

Results

The results of the paired t-test showed that there were significant differences in pre-test and post-test scores on the general health aspects of anxiety and social physique anxiety and there were no significant differences in other aspects of soldiers’ general health and body mass index. This suggests that the two-month training period affects only the variables of anxiety (anxiety, insomnia, and social physique anxiety).

Objectives

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a two-month military service period on soldiers’ general health, social physique anxiety, and body mass index. Materials and Methods: The sample included all soldiers in Isfahan’s army garrison training period. A 28-item questionnaire on general health, a social physique anxiety questionnaire (Hart et al. 1989) that measured the social physical anxiety and the ratio of weight to the height square calculating body mass index.

Background

Changes in the environment and living conditions are associated with changes in physical and cognitive functions.

General Health;Social Physique Anxiety;Body Mass Index;Armed Forces General Health;Social Physique Anxiety;Body Mass Index;Armed Forces http://www.jammonline.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=33430 Jalal Dehghanizade Jalal Dehghanizade Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Urmia University, Urmia, IR Iran; Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Urmia University, Urmia, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9139704369 Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Urmia University, Urmia, IR Iran; Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Urmia University, Urmia, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9139704369 Farshad Najafipour Farshad Najafipour Department of Epidemiology, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Epidemiology, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
en 10.5812/jamm.36377 Alopecia Areata: The Role of Stressful Events and an Estimate of Lifetime Risk in First-Degree Relatives Alopecia Areata: The Role of Stressful Events and an Estimate of Lifetime Risk in First-Degree Relatives research-article research-article Results

More than twenty-six percent of patients had a positive family history, while 6.4 percent of first-degree relatives were affected by alopecia areata. Lifetime risks were estimated at 7.6% for parents, 9.9% for siblings, and 6.4% for children. Eighty-eight patients (73.9%) experienced stressful events within six months prior to the onset or recurrences of alopecia areata, while 32 subjects (26.9%) of the control group reported such events in the last six months (P value = 0.000).

Conclusions

Calculated lifetime risks can be used in genetic counseling. It appears that stressful events can be considered to be contributing factors in the development of alopecia areata. Also, according to our results, the role of stress in the recurrence of alopecia areata is more prominent than the primary development of the disease.

Patients and Methods

One hundred and twenty-one patients with alopecia areata and their first-degree relatives, which included 597 subjects in addition to 119 controls, were studied. We considered a gender and age-matched control for each patient. They were investigated for the occurrence of stressful events within the previous six months before the onset/recurrence of the disease.

Background

Alopecia areata (AA) is a common disease in the military population; however, a few studies have calculated the lifetime risk of alopecia areata in first-degree relatives of patients as well as the impact of stress.

Objectives

The primary aim of this study was to calculate the lifetime risk of alopecia areata in first-degree relatives of index patients. The secondary aim of this study was to assess the role of stressful events in the onset/recurrence of disease.

Results

More than twenty-six percent of patients had a positive family history, while 6.4 percent of first-degree relatives were affected by alopecia areata. Lifetime risks were estimated at 7.6% for parents, 9.9% for siblings, and 6.4% for children. Eighty-eight patients (73.9%) experienced stressful events within six months prior to the onset or recurrences of alopecia areata, while 32 subjects (26.9%) of the control group reported such events in the last six months (P value = 0.000).

Conclusions

Calculated lifetime risks can be used in genetic counseling. It appears that stressful events can be considered to be contributing factors in the development of alopecia areata. Also, according to our results, the role of stress in the recurrence of alopecia areata is more prominent than the primary development of the disease.

Patients and Methods

One hundred and twenty-one patients with alopecia areata and their first-degree relatives, which included 597 subjects in addition to 119 controls, were studied. We considered a gender and age-matched control for each patient. They were investigated for the occurrence of stressful events within the previous six months before the onset/recurrence of the disease.

Background

Alopecia areata (AA) is a common disease in the military population; however, a few studies have calculated the lifetime risk of alopecia areata in first-degree relatives of patients as well as the impact of stress.

Objectives

The primary aim of this study was to calculate the lifetime risk of alopecia areata in first-degree relatives of index patients. The secondary aim of this study was to assess the role of stressful events in the onset/recurrence of disease.

Alopecia Areata;Lifetime Risk;Stressful Event Alopecia Areata;Lifetime Risk;Stressful Event http://www.jammonline.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=36377 Alireza Khoshdel Alireza Khoshdel Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2188337909 Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2188337909 Arash Shekari Arash Shekari Epidemiology Research Center, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Students’ Scientific Research Center (SSRC), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Epidemiology Research Center, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Students’ Scientific Research Center (SSRC), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Koosha Paydary Koosha Paydary Students’ Scientific Research Center (SSRC), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Students’ Scientific Research Center (SSRC), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Iraj Shekari Iraj Shekari Students’ Scientific Research Center (SSRC), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Students’ Scientific Research Center (SSRC), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
en 10.5812/jamm.36619 Outbreak of Infectious Disease Among Military Conscripts in Thailand: A Summary of the Problem in Tropical Settings Outbreak of Infectious Disease Among Military Conscripts in Thailand: A Summary of the Problem in Tropical Settings letter letter Military Personnel;Outbreak;Infection Military Personnel;Outbreak;Infection http://www.jammonline.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=36619 Beuy Joob Beuy Joob Sanitation 1 Medical Academic Center, Bangkok, Thailand; Sanitation 1 Medical Academic Center, Bangkok, Thailand. Tel: +66-24658292 Sanitation 1 Medical Academic Center, Bangkok, Thailand; Sanitation 1 Medical Academic Center, Bangkok, Thailand. Tel: +66-24658292 Viroj Wiwanitkit Viroj Wiwanitkit Hainan Medical Unviersity, Haikou, China Hainan Medical Unviersity, Haikou, China